Fred Loya is one of five brands that fall under the Loya Insurance Group. The other brands include Young America Insurance, Loya Insurance, Rodney D. Young Insurance, and National Insurance. Together, these brands put Loya Insurance Group among the 20 largest Latino-owned businesses in the U.S.

When compared to the national brands, such as GEICO and State Farm, Fred Loya is very small. Loya Insurance Group earns a spot as the 19th largest auto insurer in Texas, writing over $250 million in policies. But Loya Insurance Group only represents about 1% of Texas’ huge insurance market. As a result, many Texans only run into the Loya Insurance Group when one of their policyholders causes a car accident.

What does it take to file a car accident claim through Fred Loya? Find out in our guide below.

Filing a Claim with Fred Loya

Most national insurers have massive departments that are dedicated to processing claims. They can receive your claim 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. They often have websites and mobile apps to collect your claim information. They even have offices across the country that can examine the damage to your vehicle.

Fred Loya doesn’t have any of that. To report a claim to Fred Loya, you must call a toll-free number during office hours, available Monday through Saturday. During your call, an administrator will collect basic contact information so the company can assign the claim to a claims adjuster.

Dealing with a Fred Loya Claims Adjuster in Texas

A claims adjuster has two roles:

  1. Fulfilling Fred Loya’s obligations under the insurance policy
  2. Protecting the company’s financial interests

These roles sometimes conflict. Fred Loya, like all insurance companies, does not make money by paying claims. They do not even make money collecting premiums. Their profits come primarily from investing in the premiums that their policyholders pay.

Insurance companies establish a reserve based on a statistical analysis of their risks. An insurance company uses the money in their reserve to pay claims and invests the rest. If a company pays too many claims, they must replenish their reserve from their investments.

To protect their company’s financial interests, a claims adjuster will look for any information that can be used to poke holes in your claim.

Don’t Provide Fred Loya With a Recorded Statement

Claims adjusters might tell you that Fred Loya needs you to provide a recorded statement. This is misleading — Fred Loya might want it, but you are not required to give it.

In essence, a recorded statement is a recorded phone interview. During the interview, the claims adjuster will ask you questions about the accident. These questions may seem confusing or even leading. Insurance companies do this deliberately.

An adjuster may also use friendly banter before the statement begins to try to loosen you up. It’s important to remain alert during the entire conversation because even an offhand comment like “I’m fine” can be used to assert that your injuries were minor.

A claims adjuster can evaluate your claim without a recorded statement. The adjuster will have copies of the police report and the insured party’s statement. You or your lawyer can provide copies of your medical records to the adjuster, as well.

If you feel like you need to give a statement, consider hiring a lawyer first. A lawyer can keep the adjuster’s questions — and your answers — focused and to the point.

Information Fred Loya Will Want to Process Your Insurance Claim

You will likely need to provide additional information to the claim adjuster to support your claim. Even if the adjuster can assess fault without your cooperation, you will still need to provide copies of medical bills and other information so that they can evaluate your damages.

Some of the information that you will need to provide to Fred Loya will include:

  • Medical records that show the diagnosis of your injuries and the treatment you received
  • Medical bills for treatment and therapy sessions
  • Pharmacy bills for prescription and over-the-counter medications
  • Pay stubs, attendance records, and doctors’ notes if you missed work due to your injuries

If you have other information that is relevant to the claim, your lawyer should review it before you submit it. For example, photos and video of the accident scene, names of witnesses, and photos of the damage to your vehicle might support your claim, but they might also be twisted so that Fred Loya can try to deny your claim.

Negotiating with Fred Loya After a Car Accident in Houston

Claims adjusters rarely make a fair offer right off the bat. Some will not even offer enough to cover your medical bills. They might claim that you bear 20% of the fault, so they must cut your offer by 20%. In most cases, things like this are just negotiating tactics that are used to wear you down and drag out the process. 

Adjusters know that you likely have unpaid medical bills. They know that your injuries might prevent you from working and that you might need a settlement to make ends meet. They know that the longer they hold out, the better the chances are that you will accept a low offer.

You can counter these negotiating techniques by hiring an injury lawyer to negotiate on your behalf. Lawyers can match the skill and knowledge of claims adjusters and fight for a fair settlement.

Resolving Your Claim with Fred Loya

Insurance companies settle most injury claims. Fred Loya will probably settle your claim, too. When you want to receive the fair settlement that you deserve, however, it will likely take some patience and a solid strategy.

Texas Has At-Fault Insurance Rules

Texas uses an at-fault insurance system. When an accident occurs, this means that the insurance company for the at-fault driver is responsible to pay the claims of anyone involved in the accident.

To reduce their financial exposure, insurance companies will often look for ways to deny or reduce claims. 

Some of the ways that they can accomplish this include:

  • Shifting blame, at least partially, to you or other drivers
  • Claiming that the accident was not the cause for your injuries
  • Asserting you faked or exaggerated your injuries

By introducing doubt into the claim process, insurance adjusters can give themselves room to negotiate your claim.