Katy-area COVID-19 Cases Increase Day-over-day By 139, per July 8 Data

The Community Impact Newspaper for Katy has been tracking the COVID-19 cases reported in Katy. The City of Katy includes areas of Harris, Fort Bend, and Waller counties in Texas. Katy is located just west of Houston.

According to reporting from the Community Impact Newspaper, the COVID-19 cases in the Katy area were increasing by approximately 139 new cases each day as of July 8. On July 7, there were 3,023 coronavirus cases in Katy. On July 8, the total had increased to 3,162 cases.

The Katy zip codes located in Harris County reported a total of 2,747 cases as of July 8. Fort Bend was reporting a total of 405 cases in Katy zip codes that day. Waller County cases in Katy zip codes remained at 10 for the day.

By July 10, the number of COVID-19 cases in Katy increased to 3,327. By July 22, coronavirus cases in Katy had grown to 4,617 confirmed cases. As with other areas of Texas, COVID-19 cases continue to spread rapidly in Katy.

Houston is Headed in the Wrong Direction for COVID-19 Cases

According to the Texas Medical Center, the county is moving in the wrong direction as it fights the coronavirus. On July 22, Harris County reported 671 new cases, which is the largest number of new cases reported in a single day since the pandemic began. According to Judge Lina Hidalgo, the community needs to work to crush the curve if life is to get back on track.

On July 23, Houston reported 919 new COVID 19 cases and 11 more deaths. Judge Hidalgo and Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner have requested that the Governor approve a two-week shutdown to try to get the spread of the virus under control. Mayor Turner is also requesting that the medical community become more vocal about measures needed to reverse the sharp increase in new coronavirus cases.

However, Governor Greg Abbott said just a week before that there was not a plan to shut down the state. The week prior, Governor Abbott said that a lockdown would be the next step if the spread of the virus did not slow down. On July 20, the Governor encouraged people to wear masks to avoid a shutdown.

As government officials continue to scramble to deal with the spread of COVID-19 in Houston and throughout Texas, Texas physicians plead with Texans to wear masks. Many Texas hospitals are running out of ventilators, drugs, beds, and staff to care for patients.

What Can You Do to Stop the Spread of COVID-19?

With very limited exceptions, Texans have been ordered to wear a face covering over the mouth and nose, according to an Executive Order by Governor Abbott on July 3. The face masks should be worn inside commercial buildings and public spaces. The masks are also required in outdoor spaces when people cannot maintain at least six feet of distancing from people that do not live in their household.

The CDC and other medical and government entities have recommended wearing face coverings for some time. Face coverings have been shown to slow the spread of the virus through the air.

Other ways that you can prevent the spread of COVID-19 include:

  • Wash your hands frequently. Warm water and soap are the best way to cleanse hands. Whenever you cannot wash your hands, use hand sanitizer.
  • Cover coughs and sneezes with a tissue whenever possible and throw the tissue away immediately.
  • Clean and sanitize areas in your home and work throughout the day that are frequently touched.
  • Continue social distancing whenever possible, and avoid crowds and gatherings with people other than the people in your household.
  • If you experience any symptoms of COVID-19, stay home, and contact a medical provider immediately.
  • If you have been exposed to COVID-19, follow the instructions from your medical provider for testing and self-isolation.
  • Consider covering your face with a face mask at home if you have family members that are at high risk for contracting the disease, such as elderly parents and individuals with certain medical conditions. 

Dealing with the pandemic is stressful for everyone, especially young children. Try to take breaks from watching the coronavirus news coverage. Getting plenty of rest and exercising outdoors can also be helpful.

The Texas Department of State Health Services has a mental health support line for COVID-19. Mental health professionals are available to provide support for dealing with depression, stress, and anxiety related to the coronavirus pandemic. The Centers for Disease Control also has information available on its website for coping with the stress caused by a pandemic.